Health Matters

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HEALTH MATTERS: ANXIETY, MAY 3, 2017

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and this week dean of the University of Alabama College of Community Health Sciences Dr. Rick Streiffer is highlighting anxiety. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, one in five people in the U.S. will develop some kind of temporary or permanent mental health condition in their lifetime.

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HEALTH MATTERS: SUGAR-SWEETENED DRINKS, APRIL 26, 2017

In the South, we love our sweet tea. But as a whole, Americans are consuming too much sugar, and a good portion of that comes from beverages. A long-term sugar surplus leads to issues like obesity, diabetes and heart disease. University Medical Center Registered Dietician Diane Henson said down here, sugar is an epidemic. “It

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HEALTH MATTERS: LOWER BACK PAIN, APRIL 19, 2017

Dr. Rick Streiffer with the University of Alabama College of Community Health Sciences said most people experience lower back pain at some point in their lives. Most times, it’s treatable without a doctor’s intervention — heat, over-the-counter medications and rest go a long way to helping a hurting back. “It is one of the most

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HEALTH MATTERS: ADULT IMMUNIZATIONS, APRIL 12, 2017

Immunizations are often considered something just for children before they head to day care or school for the first time, but immunizations are important for adults, too. Dr. Jane Weida at University Medical Center in Tuscaloosa says skipping your shots can result in some nasty consequences. Adults should be getting a tetanus and diphtheria shot every

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HEALTH MATTERS: SINUSITUS, APRIL 5, 2017

    Most people develop some sinus issue or other at least once in their life. When it strikes, it’s tempting to ask your doctor for some antibiotics, but that’s not always the correct course of action. Dr. Ricky Friend with the University of Alabama’s College of Community Health Sciences says even the worst sinus

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